Seven Days (2011)-Bengali Movie Review

Sreelekha Mitra in Bengali Movie 'Seven Days'Sept 1, 2011 (Calcutta Tube): Seven Days is a 2011 Bengali film directed by Tathagata Bhattacharjee with and Shaheb Chattopadhyay, Sreelekha Mitra, Dipankar Dey, Moubani Sorcar others in the cast. Read the Bengali movie review by National Award winning film critic Shoma A. Chatterji at Calcutta Tube.

SEVEN DAYS – NO SUSPENSE

Banner: Ganpati Entertainment

Produced by: Dilip Chowdhury

Written and directed by: Tathagata Bhattacharjee

Music: Debjit Bera

Cinematography: Sudipto Sengupta

Editing: Snehasis Ganguly

Art direction: Paul

Cast: Shaheb Chattopadhyay, Sreelekha Mitra, Dipankar Dey, Subhashish Mukherjee, Moubani Sorcar, Ria Dey and others

Date of release: August 26, 2011

Rating: 03/10

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[ReviewAZON asin=”B0052XR346″ display=”inlinepost”]Tathagata Bhattacharjee has a thorough grounding in theatre. In spite of this track record, he could manage to bag a producer after a long time following his first film starring Victor Banerjee, Debasree Roy and Sabyasachi Chakraborty that was a commercial flop. But if the impressive posters and billboards of Seven Days were indicators of a really good thriller in the offing, the film is a big disappointment.

Tathagata’s story had scope for a crisp murder mystery. But the director could not make his mind up between a love story and an edge-of-the-seat, nail-biting suspense thriller. The film falls somewhere between the two, dishing out a badly made potboiler. The loud sound track and the indifferent musical score do not help. The script is confused about the characterizations, so the acting leaves much to be wanted though the medley of actors is impressive.

The relationship manager of a hotel (Sreelekha Mitra) is shot to death in her room one night. Someone – we do not know who or why – is put behind bars and life goes on. The disc jockey Riingo (Shaheb Chatterjee) pulls in crowds to the disco every evening. The youngsters perform an audacious apology of disco dancing. Stock shots of these opening frames are later used as a very bad editing device. Payal, (Moubani Sorcar) steps in as the new relationship manager. She falls in love at once with Riingo. The love is mutual. Riingo is scared to death when on a romantic outing, Payal suddenly pulls out a gun, swings it and aims it at Riingo. She is the dead relationship manager’s younger sister bent on revenge, convinced that Riingo is the real killer. He insists he is innocent. She gives him seven days to find the real killer to prove his innocence. He says he will do it because he loves her and cannot live without her. After some incredible twists and turns, he finds out who the real killer is. The lovers are united.

No director of a murder mystery should ever forget that there should be as few loopholes as possible in the chain of events around the murder. Seven Days cheerfully skirts serious issues like the post-mortem of the murder victim, asking the victim’s family to identify the body and claim it for performing the last rites, etc. What happened to the body for God’s sake? Why would Gomes (Deepankar Dey), the owner of the hotel, bother to find a stooge to take the clap for murder if he is not responsible for it? Why does the pair go to meet Gomes in prison when there is no love lost between them?

The fire of love burning between the pair happens in a matter of magic moments. Many scenes are shot as if the actors are performing in a stage play. The song sequences lack both imagination and artistry. The scenes shot in the darkness of the discotheque are out of focus. Sreelekha Mitra and Dipankar Dey are very good. Shaheb is good in parts but tends to overact in others. Subhashish Mukherjee as the seemingly good-natured manager is very good too. Moubani fails to carry the responsibility of an important role on her shoulders. The director seemed to have made the film under severe budget constraints. But better films have been made on smaller budgets.

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