KELOR KITTI (2012) Bengali Film Review: NO TRANSLATION IS NECESSARY

Review

KELOR KITTI

NO TRANSLATION IS NECESSARY

Shoma A. Chatterji

  • Banner: Jaa (i) chhatai Chalachhitram
  • Story, screenplay, dialogue and direction: Arnab Chakraborty
  • Music: Pranjol
  • Rating: 0/10

 

Pitying oneself for one’s profession is the greatest tragedy. So, when this critic was invited to a screening of Kelor Kitti, a title that defies any English translation, she was stunned to discover how audacious a filmmaker can be with a film that insults the press. Kelor Kitti can best be termed a home production made strictly as an exercise in self-indulgence for one, and for the home audience for another. Arnab Chakraborty invited us on a Sunday afternoon when the mercury was touching around 40 C. The doors to the small auditorium were locked because it was a Sunday. We stood sweated in the steaming lobby till the doors were opened after half an hour.

I have an open mind towards new filmmakers. One never knows what talent lies hidden. So I waited anxiously for the team to fix the techie problems of the DVD player. The audience comprised of all those who had participated either as actor, or cameraman or editor or sound recordist. Chakraborty himself turned out to be the protagonist of the 90-minute film which hardly has a story to speak of. He plays a married man with two friends. A love angle is woven into the story and misunderstandings between the younger pair, the man with Kelo as his nickname and his girlfriend, stand cleared by the second friend and everyone lives happily ever after.

The film has probably been shot inside the flat and on the terrace of the filmmaker’s residence. Members of the acting cast cannot be called ‘actors’ by the farthest stretch of one’s imagination including Chakraborty.  The main story is structured through a story-telling session where a writer is trying to read out his script to a probable director and a non-Bengali producer who are keener on weaving in masala stuff than in the story. Looking at the quality of this ‘film’ one would have imagined that introducing some masala stuff might have injected some life into this film that died before it was born. The script the screen writer holds is just a thin file with a few sheets stuffed inside. The main story comes back to the story-telling session till in the end, the writer walks out in disgust! End of both films and thank God for small mercies!

Kelor Kitti has very bad music, bad sets, bad cinematography if at all it can be called by this sophisticated name and terrible editing. Perhaps that is why the director decided to eschew the names in the credits unless he has done all that himself too! It is a ‘film’ that insults the intelligence, the taste and the patience of the audience including critics of all shapes and sizes. Weaver’s Studio, that screened the film, should see what it is letting itself into before screening such terrible things.

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