Eka Eka (2010) Bengali Movie Review

Eka Eka is a 2010 Bengali Film directed by Tapas Majumdar starring Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anjana Bose, Madhabi Mukhopadhyay and more. Read the critic’s review and rate the Bengali Movie.

Eka Eka is a 2010 Bengali Film directed by Tapas Majumdar starring Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anjana Bose, Madhabi Mukhopadhyay and more. Read the critic’s review and rate the Bengali Movie.

Review: EKA EKA – GO IT ALONE

by: Shoma A. Chatterji

  • Direction: Tapas Majumdar
  • Story: Jyotiprakash Chatterjee
  • Screenplay: Alok Chatterjee
  • Music: Abhijit Bose
  • Cinematography: Samiran Dutta
  • Cast: Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Amitabh Bhattacharya, Anjana Bose, Madhabi Mukhopadhyay, Kharaj Bandopadhyay and Biswajit Chakraborty.

If you stay in Kolkata and plan to see this film, give it up. Eka Eka, in spite of the best intentions of its debutant director Tapas Majumdar was lifted off the few theatres it got released in within four days of its release. Eka Eka is a classic example of how very good actors can do nothing to rescue a film from total ruin if the director is not sure of his story and cannot recognize a weak script when he sees one. Even the music, with strains of old Hindi film songs belted out by the gifted Kharaj as the neighbourhood drunk and a couple of Tagore songs positioned carefully could not help lift the film from the morass it gets stuck into.

Amitabh Bhattacharya
Amitabh Bhattacharya

Kamal (Amitabh Bhattacharya) is an ordinary clerk who lives with his pretty wife Sathi (Anjana Bose) in the distant suburbs and commutes to his office every morning. They eke out a very modest living. Their fairly complacent life is disturbed when the son of a local businessman begins to harass and stalk Sathi when Kamal is out at work. The face of this villain remains in the dark like a metaphor for all rich villains who harass vulnerable and poor neighbours. One discovers that the harassment was to force the couple out of their ancestral home and grab the premium land. Kamal is afraid initially but gathers courage and decides to stay back in the end. This three-line story is extended to fill nearly two hours of screening time. The sub-plots are highly contrived strategies to evoke interest but do precisely the opposite.

Sabyasachi Chakraborty appears like an afterthought. As their professor, he begins as a dreamer-idealist who wants to change the system with his devoted followers like Kamal and Sathi when they were young and in love. But when Kamal meets him again, he is disillusioned by the older man’s escape into anonymity on the plea of working for the downtrodden in the village he has run away to. Samiran Dutta’s camerawork in the locations is good especially in the Tagore song picturised in the small flashback at what seems like an informal camp fire. The scene where Kamal sails away from Sabyasachi’s village on a boat also offers some rich visuals. If Kamal was so talented a poet, why has he reduced himself to an ordinary, lowly clerk without ambition? Why does Sathi, who sings so well, allow her talents to dry up like a leafless tree in winter? Why is their financial status so weak when Sathi comes from an affluent background? What is Madhabi Mukherjee doing in the film? Where does the drunkard Kharaj disappear to half way through the film? The pace is grindingly slow and though the ambience is low-key are realistic, the sum of the parts are much lesser than the whole. The director will benefit if the few who have seen this film, like yours truly, relegate it to the amnesia segment of memory.

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