Antarbash (2010) Bengali Movie Review

Antarbash is a 2010 Bengali Film directed by Suhasish Chatterjee starring Soumitra Chatterjee, Chiranjit, Rajatava Dutta, Amitava Bhattacharya, Indrani Haldar, Ananya Roy, Debashree Roy and others. Read the complete critic’s review of the Movie at Calcutta Tube.

February 28 (Calcutta Tube): Antarbash is a 2010 Bengali Film directed by Suhasish Chatterjee starring Soumitra Chatterjee, Chiranjit, Rajatava Dutta, Amitava Bhattacharya, Indrani Haldar, Ananya Roy, Debashree Roy and others. Read the complete critic’s review of the Movie at Calcutta Tube.

Antarbash Cast and Crew

  • Released on      :      26 February 2010
  • Language/Type     :     Bengali /U/A
  • Casting     :     Soumitra Chatterjee, Chiranjit, Rajatava Dutta, Amitava Bhattacharya, Indrani Haldar, Ananya Roy, Debashree Roy, Haradhan Bandyopadhyay, Lily Chakraborty, Subhasish Mukhopadhyay, Kalyan Chatterjee.
  • Directed by     :     Suhasish Chatterjee
  • Music Director     :     Amit Dasgupta
  • Lyrics     :     Amit Dasgupta,GoutamSusmit,RabindranathTagore
  • Producer     :     Subhajit Roy
  • Rating: 3/10

Review: JE AACHHO ANTARE – ANTARBASH-THOROUGHLY UNCONVINCING

Amitabha and Ananya in Antarbash Film
Amitabha and Ananya in Antarbash Film

Laboni (Ananya Roy), a newly married bride on honeymoon with husband Amit in Digha, suddenly goes missing. The local police officer (Ramen Roychoudhury), rude and brazen, asks Amit (Amitabha Bhattacharya) awkward questions but his older brother Dibyasundar (Chiranjit), pulls some strings and bails him out. He comes back to Kolkata. Amit is the youngest son in an extended Bengali family. His grandfather (Haradhan Bandopadhyay), father Debsundar Lahiri (Soumitra Chatterjee), wife Lilabati (Lily Chakraborty), two brothers Dibyasundar and Aloksundar (Rajatbha Dutta) with their wives Ranjana (Debasree) and Himani (Indrani Haldar) make up the family.

Amitabha and Ananya in Bengali Movie Antarbash
Amitabha and Ananya in Bengali Movie Antarbash

Laboni was disgusted with husband Amit’s obsession with his job and his persistent neglect of his bride and of her needs – emotional and physical. Laboni drives away in a private taxi to land up at her husband’s friend Arko’s mess, adding to misunderstandings. She requests him to help her get shelter in a ladies’ hostel but he persuades her to go back to her in-laws. She is adamant. Strangely however, she keeps calling different members of the family. Her father-in-law invites her to listen to her side of the story and asks his sons and their wives to participate in a family meeting.  Himani persuades her to agree. When the meeting begins, mother-in-law Lilabati is scandalized by her daughter-in-law’s behaviour. Himani insists that times have changed and wives are no longer tolerant of their husband’s disrespect and sidetracking. A shocked Debsundar listens to his eldest son who holds forth on the sexual side of marriage but tells Laboni that she is free to walk out if she thinks she has not been treated well by her husband. Just as she walks down the staircase, suitcase in hand, Amit begs her to stay on. The film ends, very unconvincingly, on a happy note.

Director Suhasis Chatterjee seems to have lost interest while shooting the film. There are several dramatics in the narrative he has forgotten to explain or carry through. When Amit copes with the shock of losing Laboni, he remembers intimate moments they shared as they rolled on the beaches of Digha, sang songs, held close and so on. Is this a dream scene? Then how is it that Laboni has similar memories? If this is not a dream, then how does the director explain the schism in the relationship?

Debosree and Chiranjit in Antarbash
Debosree and Chiranjit in Antarbash

The second loophole is Amit’s personal secretary thrown out of her job coinciding with her getting pregnant. She comes to Amit’s home after requesting Laboni for a meeting and tells him that she is pregnant. Laboni walks in at that moment and the chasm in the relationship widens beyond redemption. The secretary is never seen again nor is her pregnancy referred to even once over the film. Ranjana, the eldest daughter-in-law, at one point says that she will not remain present at the family meeting because. “After all, I am not the daughter-in-law of this family.” Who, then, is she and how does this statement justify her relationship with Divyasundar, apparently her husband? Why do the media land at the Lahiri home to hassle Debsundar with questions about his daughter-in-law’s disappearance when there is no inkling about the family’s celebrity status? Incidentally, the word ‘antarbaash’ in Bengali literally means ‘undergarment’ though here the word is qualified by the phrase ‘je aachhe antare signifying one’s ‘inner psyche.’ But the argument does not hold water.

Rajatabha and Indrani Haslar in Antarbash
Rajatabha and Indrani Haslar in Antarbash

The acting cast does justice to the sketchily penned characters they have been given. But the highest marks go to Haradhan who plays the Alzheimers’ ridden old father of Debsundar. His vocabulary is reduced to two words, payesh khabo’ and he does this brilliantly with a vacant expression on his face. Newcomer Ananya Roy as Laboni neither has screen presence nor can move a muscle in her face to express emotion. She has lent her voice to two Tagore songs and has sung beautifully. Subhashish Mukerjee’s immense talent is wasted in forced comic cameo. Amitabha as Amit suspiciously appears to be impotent. He is not aroused for a second when Laboni emerges from the restroom dripping wet, wrapped in a white towel, her dusky shoulders revealed.

Amit Dasgupta’s musical score is very good and the song sequences, except in the birthday scene where Debasree breaks into a dance and the ‘item’ number forced into the film are positioned well.  Arindam Bhatacharya’s cinematography captures the cityscape of Kolkata as smoothly and as beautifully as it does the sun kissed beaches of Digha and the silhouetted figures of Amit and Laboni. Amitabha Bhattacharya has an uncanny way of picking wrong roles and wrong films that get him nowhere. I will not give this film a rating of more than three on ten.

By: Shoma A. Chatterji

Antarbash Movie Gallery


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